News & Media

ESCMID Panorama

Contact information

If you are interested in the society's and ECCMID's press activities, please contact

ESCMID Communications Manager

Chantal Britt


Phone: +41 61 508 01 57
Mobile: +41 76 588 08 24

Press releases

02 August 2017
'Antibiotic stewardship teams' must be planned and paid for worldwide to halt the spread of dangerous infections

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25 July 2017
ESCMID supports the Belgian Society for Infectiology and Clinical Microbiology (BVIKM - SBIMC) in their efforts to gain recognition of Infectious Diseases as a medical specialty in Belgium.

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19 June 2017
ESCMID supports the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) in their efforts to gain recognition of Infectious Diseases as a medical specialty in Spain

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15 May 2017

Market pressures and inadequate production are hampering access to essential antibiotics, including those for treating babies and children

Antibiotics used to treat a variety of common bacterial infections are becoming more difficult to access, mostly because the drugs are less profitable for manufacturers to produce and market. Writing in a commentary in Clinical Microbiology and Infection [1], researchers say the problem is particularly acute for formulations needed to treat sick babies and children. They say doctors increasingly have to use alternative antibiotic treatments, which may have worse side-effects for patients, including encouraging the growth of drug-resistant bacteria – one of the greatest threats to public health.

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A new report by the World Health Organization lays out, for the first time, which antibiotic-resistant bacteria pose the greatest risk to global health and urgently need new effective treatments. The report was chaired by Prof. Evelina Tacconelli, executive committee member of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) in collaboration with the WHO and with input from several ESCMID experts.

The WHO Global priority list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to guide research, discovery, and development of new antibiotics report is targeted at pharmaceutical companies, research institutions and policy-makers around the world. It is part of broader efforts to tackle the rising tide of infections that have become resistant to the drugs commonly used to treat them.

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One in five physicians working in medical microbiology and infectious diseases is suffering from burnout, bullying and poor work-life balance, according to a study published in European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases.The findings, which come from a survey of more than 400 young doctors working across Europe, also show that women’s experiences are worse than men’s, and that the situation is worse for doctors working in southern and eastern European countries.The survey, which included responses from 416 participants with an average age of 32, was conducted anonymously online by the Trainee Association of ESCMID.

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The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) through its annual grant programme helps young investigators pursue ground-breaking research to advance our understanding of microorganisms and find better approaches to diagnose, prevent and treat infectious diseases. At the end of 2016 the society is highlighting two outstanding projects that have been funded through its research grants; one was a study on resistance after treating patients with antifungal drugs and another on the genetic evolution of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype 16 causing most of the HPV-related anogenital cancers in humans.

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Experts at the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST), who define the optimal drug concentrations to inhibit the growth of pathogens, have found that genetic methods cannot yet be used to test for susceptibility in a number of important bacterial species. Although there have been advances in whole genome sequencing (WGS), which allows to determine the DNA sequence of an organism’s genome at a single time, there are still several hurdles to overcome before this type of genetic testing can be used in clinical laboratories, they concluded in their report, which is freely accessible.

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download picture of Neil Woodford presenting the report at ECCMID 2016 in Amsterdam

More than half of general practitioners (GPs) recommend vaccination for their patients that differ from their practices for their own children, according to a survey in France, which was recently published in the journal Clinical Microbiology and Infection. The physicians’ attitudes varied for different reasons, like the confidence they have on the benefits and the safety of individual vaccines.

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Experts at the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (ESCMID) are joining colleagues across the globe this week to promote prudent use of antibiotics. They show their support for the European Antibiotic Awareness Day (EAAD) on 18 November, which was inaugurated in 2006 to raise awareness of antimicrobial resistance. EAAD forms part of World Antibiotic Awareness week from 14 – 20 November, which reflects the fact that the war against antimicrobial resistance must be a global effort. Some of the society’s activities throughout this week and since its foundation more than 30 years ago are highlighted on its dedicated Fighting Resistance webpage.

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Airports are international travel hubs visited by large numbers of people. London Heathrow, for example, has an average of 205,400 travellers every day and saw 75 million people arriving and departing from all over the world in 2015. A study just published in the journal Clinical Microbiology and Infection suggests that international travellers can acquire antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and may spread these bacteria in their home countries after returning from abroad.

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The flu season is almost here and The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (ESCMID) and its specialist vaccine study group, the ESCMID Study Group for Vaccines (EVASG) is calling on all pregnant women to sign up for their flu vaccine. Usually the advice for pregnant women is to avoid medications and vaccinations, but the inactivated flu vaccine is not only beneficial to the woman concerned, it can also protect her baby from infection during the first few months of life.
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The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) have just closed a joint conference in Vienna, which helped researchers accelerate the development of new antimicrobials and shed light on the challenges associated with antimicrobial resistance.

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The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) sent an open letter to UN President, H.E. Mr Mogens Lykketoft ahead of the high-level meeting on antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The society is urging the Secretary General to work towards setting binding targets and taking concrete action to effectively fight AMR.

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The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) has released new guidelines on best practice methods to diagnose Clostridium difficile infection (CDItypo3/#_edn1). The latest document updates the original 2009 guidelines produced by the society, and includes recommendations concerning the use of new diagnostic technology such as nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT).

Significantly more women than men diagnosed with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) – a blood infection of the common bacteria – die within 30 days, a study just published shows. The authors recommend that gender should be considered in the triage and risk stratification of patients with community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia.

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link to study in CMI

The study by researchers from the Department of Neurology at the University of Ulsan College of Medicine in Seoul showed that herpes zoster infection not only raised the risk of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke but also that of a transient ischaemic attack (TIA), a warning mini-stroke often preceding a full-blown stroke. The results are published in the June issue of Clinical Microbiology and Infection.

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link to June issue of CMI

The conference in Vienna will address issues such as the reliance on very robust preclinical studies, innovative clinical trial design, strong academic/industrial partnerships, and a requirement for early engagement with regulatory bodies in order to facilitate the processes for accelerated antimicrobial development.

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21/06/2016, Saint-Étienne, France: In clinical settings, mobile phones benefit patients by placing useful data and information at the fingertips of health professionals during interactions on the ward. But are doctors and nurses unwittingly exposing vulnerable patients to a potential source of infection just by tapping their touch screen?

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Prof. Robert A. Bonomo received the ESCMID Award for Excellence in Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases 2016 for his outstanding lifetime contribution to the field of antimicrobial resistance. At ECCMID 2016, two young scientists were also honoured for their contributions to the research and medical community will the ESCMID Young Investigator Awards for Research in Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. 

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New data from ten late-breaking abstracts is released at ECCMID 2016. At the congress, a dedicated session will examine recently released research across the full spectrum of infectious diseases both from a clinical and laboratory perspective. Researchers presented recent data on a number of diagnostic tools to rapidly identify pathogens and therapies promising to treat challenging infections. The abstracts presented dealt with topics including meningitis, pulmonary tuberculosis, Zika and human papilloma virus.

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Small and innovative pharmaceutical companies, with products in early stages of development, presented some of their novel approaches and antimicrobial therapies under development during a dedicated session at ECCMID. Dr Ursula Theuretzbacher, the founder of the Centre for Anti-Infective Agents in Vienna, led the session, which gave an overview of the research and development programmes that are driving innovation in this critical space.

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Medical professionals, business and government officials from around the world joined in Amsterdam on the sidelines of the ECCMID 2016 Conference, hosted by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID), to declare their commitment to fight antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in a concerted effort.

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Seven late-breaking abstracts highlight the need for comprehensive screening programmes, improved therapy and vaccination coverage in countries receiving large numbers of refugees. Researchers have observed increased prevalence of resistant pathogens or emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases including HIV, tuberculosis, Salmonella, Shigella, scabies and other parasitic infections in refugees and migrants, according to data presented at ECCMID 2016, the annual meeting of the  European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (ESCMID).

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A recently discovered genetic mechanism allowing bacteria to develop and transfer resistance to colistin, one of the last-resort antibiotics, has been present in many countries across the world for more than a decade, according to late-breaking data presented at ECCMID.

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Late-breaker session chair Prof. Alex Friedrich

Late-breaker presenter Abdul

Late-breaker presenter Veldman

A review published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy has found that women are on average 27 per cent more likely than men to be prescribed certain types of antibiotics. The study was financed by the German Centre for Infectious Diseases in collaboration with ESCMID (European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases)'s Parity Commission. 

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The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID), the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and the International Sepsis Forum (ISF) jointly initiate the European Sepsis Academy to improve the diagnosis and treatment of the life-threatening condition. 

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Experts at the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) are developing tools to monitor the spread of the Zika virus and are conducting research to gather more solid data to better assess the risks associated with the infection. In a review researchers discussed the rapid spread of Zika virus in the Americas and concluded that the virus and other arboviruses may not only pose a threat to residents of Brazil, but also to attendees of the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic games in Rio de Janeiro. Meanwhile, colleagues are also working hard on the development of better diagnostic tools and on improving the monitoring of the virus’ spread, as they are preparing for a possible outbreak in Europe and the return of the virus to the African continent where it was first isolated in 1947.

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